Posts Tagged ‘Midnight’

Mikel Jollett of The Airborne Toxic Event at Sonic Boom, Aug. 2014. Photo by Creative Copper Images (http://www.creativecopperimages.com/).

Mikel Jollett of The Airborne Toxic Event at Sonic Boom, Aug. 2014. Photo by Credit Creative Copper Images (http://www.creativecopperimages.com/).

By Juan Manuel

The title is not an overstatement. Five musicians from a country I am not even from had a larger influence on me than any other music I had ever heard before. That’s right, I am not from the U.S., or from England, or any other English speaking country. I am Colombian, and truth be told I am probably the only Colombian in the world that knows and loves TATE.

My journey to finding TATE goes through one man: my father. You should probably also know that I am just 16, and I was much younger when I was introduced to TATE. So it was thanks to my father that I started listening to their first album. He stumbled upon them while searching for music on iTunes, and as he once told me, “After listening to ‘Sometime Around Midnight’ I knew that this band was special; that song is the best song ever made, and it is my all time favorite.” In that me and my father agreed, “Sometime Around Midnight” was the best song ever to be made, and after listening tirelessly to their first album me and my dad had just one topic in our conversations: just how much we loved that band.

It is hard for me to explain my fascination with their music, my friends don’t understand why I like them that much, and to be honest I don’t either. I guess that I love their sincerity. In a world in which music is made to sell, and lyrics are often empty and meaningless, TATE is the exception. They do the music they love, whether people like it or hate it, as evidenced by their new album. And Mikel Jollett’s songwriting is just beautiful. I tried searching for another adjective to describe the lyrics but I just couldn’t find one that describes them as they deserve; that’s it, the lyrics are simply beautiful.

I have listened to every song of every album countless times, and I don’t get tired. Usually, when you listen to a song one too many times it loses its appeal; that hasn’t and will never happen with TATE’s music. The bond me and my father made through their music was truly special; we would sit and talk for hours about what our favorite songs were and how badly we wanted to see them live. My dad was able to; he took my mom to one of their concerts in Fort Lauderdale, and came back even more in love with the band. He told me that it was one of the best concerts he had ever attended (and he had gone to many, many, concerts) and that he had the chance to meet them; he had talked to Steven in the bathroom and their humbleness and friendliness truly astonished him. He also told me that the band was excited to have fans from such an unlikely place. When he and my mom arrived back home, my dad gave me a TATE shirt signed by all the band members, and three years later I still have that shirt displayed in my room.

I loved the band, and they were already firmly entrenched as my all time favorite, however it took a tragic situation to elevate TATE to a crucial part of my life. One week after they released “Wrong,” their first song from their last album, my dad passed away. He was young, but three brain tumors were too much to handle, and he moved on to a better place. It was then when TATE became the thing that, in my eyes, would always keep me linked to my dad. Even if he is not on this earth anymore, every time one of their songs plays on my iPod, my first thought is my dad, and for that I am forever grateful toTATE. My dad’s love for “Sometime Around Midnight” was so much that we played the song, full blast, at my father’s funeral. A song that has very little to do with death and was not very appropriate for the occasion, but it represented my father, so we played it, and people loved it.

When my dad was really sick and in a hospital bed I played him “Wrong” for the first time; he could barely talk back then, but he managed to say “It’s weird, but I like it.” I couldn’t have put in in better words myself.

So, this is my story, the story of the band I love, the story of my relationship with my dad. I could go on and on talking about why I love them and all they mean to me, but I don’t want to bore you. I apologize if my grammar is bad or if you don’t understand something, please take into account English is my second language and I am currently a little distracted, as I am listening to “California” and “Time to be a Man” at full blast on my speakers.

I also wanted to share with you some of my favorite TATE songs. The list is not in chronological order, or in order of preference, they are just the songs that I love the most, and that I could think about from the top of my head. (Please take into account that I have not yet heard Songs of God and Whiskey):

  • Sometime Around Midnight
  • Wishing Well
  • Elizabeth
  • Missy
  • Neda
  • One Time Thing
  • Welcome to Your Wedding Day
  • The Graveyard Near the House
  • My Childish Bride
  • The Kids Are Ready to Die
  • This is London
  • Gasoline
  • California
  • All for a Woman
  • The Girls in Their Summer Dresses
  • Time to be a Man

A TATE ChristmasBy Glen

‘Twas Sometime Around Midnight on Christmas, in the Graveyard Near the House,
Not a creature was stirring, nor a “Where’s Noah?” grouse.
The stockings were hung by the chimney with care,
In hopes that Dope Machines soon would be there.

The TATE fans were nestled all snug in their beds,
While visions of Airborne shows danced in their heads.
I imagined myself in Daren’s black bowler hat,
I needed a TATE fix, and I needed it STAT!

All At Once in the street there arose such a clatter,
The roar of a motorbike the silence did shatter.
In a stupor I stumbled down from the second floor,
Swaying, braying, I burst through the door.

It was a bleary-eyed night, beneath the streetlight,
I needed a moment to take in the sight.
And what to my wondering eyes should appear,
But a poet, a singer, weighed down with gear.

The bird and the mermaid, they were obvious tells,
I knew in a moment it must be Mikel.
Greedy for more, I was blinded by fame,
And I whistled, and shouted, and called them by name!

“Now Daren! Now, Steven! Now, Adrian and Anna!
On, Hoogie! On, Pete Galli! And you too, Bill Handlin!
To the top of the stage! To the top of the wall!
Not so high please Mikel – I’m afraid you will fall!”

And then, in a twinkling, I regained my senses,
A rare opportunity – it was time to take chances.
“It is most unexpected to find you out here,
Like the synth-heavy sounds you’re embracing this year.”

“We take care of our fans,” he said with a wink,
“You should know that by now, wouldn’t you think?
On The Fifth Day of Christmas, your True Love asked me,
To give you a gift you never thought you’d see.”

He was dressed all in black, from his head to his foot,
And into his guitar case, his hand he did put.
“What can I give you? A bird with some gore?
What more could you want after the Fillmore?”

“All I Ever Wanted,” I slowly began,
“Was just one more gig for a crazed super fan.
Can you play This is Nowhere? It’s such a great song,
But if that can’t be done, I’d settle for Wrong.”

He was cooler than cool; I was feeling unworthy,
My insides were Numb and I was getting too wordy.
But he put me at ease with a nod of his head,
He’s good with his fans; I had nothing to dread.

So I took a deep breath, “A request if I may,
A happy TATE song for the holidays?
A little less death, a little more joy,
Something appropriate for my little boy?”

He said, “Not my style; that music sounds dated,
And holiday cheer is so overrated.
I’ve tried to be sappy; I’ve tried to write kitsch,
But sometimes Christmas can make you feel like shit.”

He sprang to his bike, flashed his 7th Heaven smile,
And then he assured me, “We’ll be back in awhile.”
And I heard him exclaim, ‘ere he drove out of sight,
“Merry Christmas to all! Make some babies tonight!”

The Airborne Toxic EventBy Glen

Ed. Note: Just 16 days from now, The Airborne Toxic Event will take to the stage of The Fillmore in San Francisco, CA, to play their self-titled debut album from front to back. They’ll do the same the following two nights with their next two albums, All At Once and Such Hot Blood. As part of our countdown to this momentous occasion, each of This Is Nowhere’s writing staff will share why one of these albums is their favorite TATE record. Today, Glen makes the case for the debut; on Sept. 9, Jamie will delve into the sophomore album; and on Sept. 16 Julie will tackle the band’s most recent release.

One need only flip to the second page of the CD booklet of The Airborne Toxic Event’s eponymous 2009 release to confirm that you’ve got something special in your hands.

At a glance, the lyrics to “Wishing Well” look more like the first chapter of a novel than the opening song of a rock ‘n’ roll album. Which is fitting because, in a way, that’s exactly what they are.

As per TATE’s founding mythology, Mikel Jollett started out writing a book, and ended up writing an album. The truth of the legend is plainly evident in the utter lack of concern the writer exhibits for anything resembling traditional song structure throughout the ten-song collection. The music of The Airborne Toxic Event has been described as story set to music and poetry you can dance to, and it is in this first album that this well-deserved reputation was forged.

In the years between then and now, Mikel has grown immeasurably in his craft as a songwriter. He has become ever more adept at spinning his tales concisely; more proficient at weaving his yarns around the choruses and hooks that large audiences seem to require. This is undeniably a positive development.

AND YET…

The imperfect perfection of this naive and lovely first effort is equally undeniable. Here, a thousand words are worth far more than a picture. Here, a beating heart carved from a writer’s chest and placed on a shelf for all to gawk at captivates more powerfully than a mere chorus ever could. Here, we are drawn into a world we may never have lived in, and may never choose to inhabit, but which inexplicably feels like home nonetheless.

I could talk about the songs: how the mournful wail of the viola that opens “Sometime Around Midnight” never fails to send a chill ripping straight down my spine; how screaming out the final desperate lines to “Missy” in noisy, rowdy unison with 1,000 other voices in a crowd, all of them failing after two hours of singing along to every verse, provides unmatched catharsis; how “Innocence” moves my soul more deeply with its instrumentation alone than virtually any other song can do with words.

Or I could talk about the vocabulary: how words like mescaline and coquette and accoutrements and courtesan just don’t belong in rock songs, until you hear them here and realize that of course they do.

Or I could talk about the live shows, and how recent setlists suggest that the band members themselves seem to privilege their earlier work, whether because of their own personal preference for it or a nagging suspicion (right or wrong) that this is what the audience will respond to most enthusiastically.

But it all comes back to story. The stories told here are not my stories, but they have become mine. No, not mine – ours. Mikel’s stories have become the band’s stories have become the fans’ stories, and that’s what we’ll all gather together to celebrate those three sacred nights at The Fillmore.

If you ask me tomorrow to name my favorite album by The Airborne Toxic Event, I might give you a different answer. I might tell you that “The Graveyard Near the House” has the most profound lyrics I have ever heard put to music, and therefore I must choose All At Once. I might try to explain how the musical expedition that is “Safe,” with its peaks and its valleys and its whispers and its screams and its back and forth between Mikel and Anna and viola and guitar and Everything, leaves me exhilarated every time, compelling me to pick Such Hot Blood.

But without this tortured maiden voyage into the wounded depths of the writer’s psyche, there is no All At Once or Such Hot Blood. It is here that the stories are first told; here that the world which would later be fleshed out in bright and shiny color is first sketched in pencil.

Not everyone sees what we see in this picture. Some just cannot overlook the rough edges and the lack of polish and that damn, bloody bird. To them, it all just looks like such a mess.

But what a beautiful mess it is.

Glen, Fan of The Airborne Toxic EventGlen is the founder and editor of This Is Nowhere. He’s grateful for an understanding wife and kids who indulge his silly compulsion to chase a band all over the Pacific Northwest (and occasionally beyond) every time the opportunity arises.

Colleen HooverEd. Note: We recently stumbled across an interview with New York Times bestselling author Colleen Hoover, in which she mentioned that her new novel, Ugly Love, was inspired by the music of The Airborne Toxic Event. Naturally, this piqued our interest. Earlier this week, we had a chance to connect with Colleen to hear more about the book, her TATE fandom, and how the band influenced her latest work.

Colleen is generously giving away a signed copy of Ugly Love to one lucky reader. (Update: the prize has been won by Anna Shaw. Congrats!)

For those who aren’t familiar with your work, tell us a little bit about yourself and your writing career thus far.

I’ve been writing for a little less than three years now.  I’ve always wanted to be a writer, but I married young and had three kids while in college, and writing couldn’t really pay our bills. Because of this, I graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Social Work in 2005. I was working for the state of Texas as a social worker and my husband was a full-time truck driver.  We were living in a mobile home with our three kids and living paycheck to paycheck, but we were happy.  I began writing my first “story” in late 2011 for fun, and self-published it to Amazon in January, 2012. I never tried to get it published because I didn’t think anyone would care to read it. I also didn’t think it was good enough to ever be considered a “novel.”  I mostly wrote the story for friends and family, but word of mouth began to spread and within five months of the book being on Amazon, it became a New York Times bestseller.  Since then, I’ve signed with Simon & Schuster, and have completed six more novels, all of which have been bestsellers on the New York Times.  It has, without a doubt, been an insane two years and I’m just trying to keep up.

What can you tell us about your writing style, and themes you tackle in your work?

I’m a very ADD reader, which means I’m not a very good reader.  I get bored easily and tend to skip over detailed descriptions and entire chapters.  I write the same way that I read, so I have to keep my books fast-paced and interesting with a lot of dialogue or I’d never finish writing them.  I’d get way too bored.  I don’t think of myself as an author and I definitely don’t consider my books literature.  I don’t write to educate or inform, I simply write to entertain.

I do, however, love to play devil’s advocate with my stories.  I like to take controversial themes and throw them into my book so that when people read them, they are seeing things from a different perspective.  I mean, we all know student-teacher relationships are wrong, but in one of my books, I write it in a way that you can’t help but root for the couple.

Without giving anything away of course, can you give us an overview of Ugly Love? What’s it all about?

Ugly Love is about a guy named Miles and a girl named Tate who become neighbors.  Miles is really brooding and intense and quiet.  The type of guy Tate is drawn to.  They enter into a “friends with benefits” type of relationship, only they weren’t really friends to begin with.  Miles tells Tate he only has two rules for their arrangement:

Don’t ask about his past and never expect a future.

Well…that gets a little difficult and the rest of the story builds from there.

It’s not your typical, “Guy and girl have a sexual relationship and end up falling in love” story.  It’s essentially two stories in one, and one of the stories will break your heart while the other will hopefully put it back together again.

You mentioned in another interview that your inspiration for Miles came when you were listening to The Airborne Toxic Event. Were there any songs in particular that inspired the book or Miles’ character? If so, which one(s)? How is TATE’s influence seen in the book, aside from the obvious use of the name Tate for your lead character, and of Mikel as Miles’ middle name?

I was listening to “The Fifth Day” while driving and got the idea for Miles’s character.  His personality fits that song perfectly.  Once I began focusing on his character, I built the rest of the story around that.

Tate’s character wasn’t necessarily inspired by anything other than Miles’s character.  I wanted him to find someone who would challenge him. The feel for the book, however, was inspired by the song, “Sometime Around Midnight.”  That’s one of my favorite TATE songs, because it has all the feels.  Angst, Love, Heartbreak, Agony.  I wanted the book to produce those same reactions in the reader.

Do you see parallels between your own writings on love, loss and dark subjects (like in your book Hopeless) and similar themes in Airborne’s songs?

I believe music in itself is a parallel to books.  Especially TATE’s music.  The lyrics they write are unlike any other lyrics I’ve ever read, and it almost feels as if each song tells a story.  I think one of the parallels I’ve noticed between their lyrics and my novels is that, despite the fact that my novels are romance novels, they are also books about life. About real issues and real people.  Books about death and heartache and loss. It’s so much more than “just” a romance, and I feel this with their music.  They have songs that revolve around life and death and issues that have nothing to do with romance.  One of my favorites is “All At Once.”  I remember a few months ago the song came on during a drive with my mother.  I didn’t even notice she was paying attention to it, but once the song ended, she took her glasses off and began wiping her eyes.  She said, “That’s a powerful song.”

And she’s right.  It’s a powerful song and I only hope that I can get across a fraction of those feelings when I write my books.

In your previous books there were several references to the Avett Brothers. Is there any reason you chose not to directly mention TATE in this one?

When I first wrote Slammed, I honestly didn’t think anyone would read it.  I decided to add lyrics to the book from The Avett Brothers, because one of their lines, “Decide what to be and go be it,” is actually what inspired me to start writing.  I was so grateful for those lyrics that I thought it would be a good way to thank them by hopefully introducing a few of my friends to their music through adding the lyrics to the book.  I never imagined so many people would read the book.  That’s a wonderful thing, but I also have this fear in the back of my head that maybe The Avett Brothers assume I used their lyrics for personal gain, to piggy back off their fan-base.  I know that’s preposterous, because those guys are awesome and would never think that (hopefully), but it’s still always a nagging fear.  Because of this, it has changed my experience with their music.  They are and will always be one of my favorite bands, but I get really self-conscious when I talk about them publicly because of those random fears.

I love TATE to the moon and back and was afraid the same thing would happen if I were to include them or their lyrics with Ugly Love.  In a sense, it’s almost very selfish of me, because I just don’t want my experience with their music to be affected in any way.  I thought it would be neat to put a few hidden gems into the book and see if the true TATE fans would recognize them.  Kind of like a little, “Hey!  I’m a fan, too!” kind of thing, rather than an in-your-face, “I LOVE THIS BAND EVERYONE NEEDS TO LOVE THEM TOO OMG” kind of thing.

I don’t know if any of that makes sense.

Do you consider yourself a big Airborne fan? If so, how long have you followed the band and how did you discover them?

The first song I heard by them was “Changing.”  A friend had posted it on Facebook and wasn’t even talking about the band or the song when she posted it, just about the message she received when someone sent her the song.  I clicked on the song and absolutely loved it, and then clicked on the next and the next and the next.  You know how it goes.  By the end of the hour, I had downloaded every single song they had on iTunes and I haven’t stopped listening to them since.

Have you seen the band live? If so, do you have any special concert memories?

I saw them in Chicago last year and it was the BEST night of my life.  I’m very weird when it comes to meeting celebrities.  I’m the type of person who would rather never meet them, because I’m very awkward in person.  However, the two girls I was with at the concert wanted to stay afterward and hopefully catch them walking to the bus. We hung around for a while and after six Margaritas (I never drink, so I was smashed) one of the crew members handed me a setlist when he walked by me.  I screamed (I’m not a screamer) and couldn’t believe how excited I was.  I just don’t get very outwardly excited, but the second I got that setlist I wanted nothing more than to get a picture with Mikel.  Well, he walked out and began taking pics with the crowd.  We were off to the side and several of his friends were waiting for him across the street.  He told everyone he needed to go and began walking away and my friend yelled, “She flew all the way from Texas to get a picture with you!” So he stopped and turned around and took this pic with us.  I’m on the right.

Mikel Jollett with Colleen Hoover

Best moment of my life.

Finally, as you probably know, The Airborne Toxic Event drew their name from Don DeLillo’s novel White Noise. Have you read it, and if so, what did you think of it?

I actually have not read the novel, but know of the connection.  I love that their band name was inspired by a novel.  I watched an interview with them recently in which the reporter stated Mikel started out writing a book, which turned into writing lyrics somehow.  I find that fascinating, because it’s further proof that art can inspire art.  My writing career was inspired by music and Mikel’s music career was inspired by writing.

One of the things I love to do in my novels is incorporate some form of art into books.  In my first novel, the main character is a slam poet and performs on stage.  It was a challenge to capture the feel of performance poetry through written word, but I had so much fun doing it, that it inspired my novel Maybe Someday.  The characters in Maybe Someday are musicians, and I teamed up with musician Griffin Peterson to create an original soundtrack to accompany the book.  All the songs on the soundtrack were “created” by the characters during scenes in the book.

With Ugly Love, I took a bit of liberty with all the chapters from Miles’s point of view.  They aren’t written in a typical fashion.  I use different fonts and word placement, centering down the page to give more of a visual impact when he experiences different emotions.

With my newest novel, Confess, I’ve teamed up with an artist in London who is creating all the pieces of art that the “character” paints in the book.

I love to bridge the gap between reading and other forms of art.  Maybe that’s what drew me to TATE’S music in the beginning.  They do the same with their music.  If you pay close attention, especially in songs such as “Sometime Around Midnight,” it’s more than just music and lyrics.  The song begins like a soft opening introduction to a story, and then the music builds and builds throughout the song, creating a suspenseful feel before reaching the “climax” and then easing us into “the end.”

It’s almost as if the songs are books themselves.  Maybe that’s why I love them all so much.

Purchase Ugly Love:

Amazon
iBooks
Barnes & Noble

Purchase the Music that Inspired Ugly Love:

The Fifth Day
Sometime Around Midnight

The Airborne Toxic Event guitar picksBy Nick

It all started during my junior year of high school. You know, with the high school sweetheart. The person you profoundly claim to be “the love of your life,” the person you spend countless hours with, being intimate with, being vulnerable with, being yourself with, trading clichés and promises like baseball cards on a daily basis while the two of you plan the rest of your lives together while living on a fine line made of steel and heartache that will hold you two tightly in irrational and impulsive instances of self-destructive love and passion. At least, that’s how my relationship with my high school sweetheart was. It was fun.

But she ended up moving away for college while I stayed at home due to my incompetence in school and the obligations of being the eldest of my siblings. Of course, like many others, we would aspire to be “the exception” among the countless relationships that end due to the long distance and separation. And, of course, like many others, we weren’t. It is not my duty to share the circumstances of how it ended, but it ended abruptly and it did not end well.

As I felt this mighty temple of promise, security and trust we created out of that relationship crushing under the weight of the world, I discovered The Airborne Toxic Event.

A friend of mine posted the music video to “Sometime Around Midnight” on Facebook. I remember that night so well, too. It was Halloween night and I hadn’t slept in three days because I didn’t know how to cope with that jarring heartache that followed the breakup. I was playing lots of Johnny Cash songs on my guitar as the doorbell rang with trick-or-treaters demanding candy. I tortured myself wondering why everything fell apart, how oblivious I was to miss the cracks and bends in a relationship I thought was as solid as a boulder. And the absolute worst feeling was feeling I was alone in it all. That no one knew what I was going through. That there was nothing anyone could say, no song that anyone could sing or movie I could watch that would sympathize with me at that moment in time.

But hearing “Sometime Around Midnight” was soothing, sobering. And I listened to it again and again. I let the viola and cello wash into my head like the feral waves described in the song. And again. The notes of the rhythm guitar quickly chipped away at my curiosity and wonder that plagued my mind. And again. I listened to Mikel’s lyrics as if it were the gospel, as if he was preaching how I felt word for word. I was lost in the haze of the wine. The world was falling around me. And it was at that moment I realized I wasn’t alone. I wasn’t the only one feeling the way I felt, that there are others who feel this way and that there were others who felt this way before. I felt a sense of solidarity, a sense of comfort knowing that my pain wasn’t unique, that my heartbreak was ubiquitous, that others have seen the person they once loved walk out of that universal, metaphorical bar with another and felt their world fall to pieces. After hearing that song I finally slept again.

My TATE experience didn’t end there, though. That was just the beginning, but seeing as how you are reading this on a blog sharing the title of an obscure song such as “This Is Nowhere,” I have a feeling you already knew that. After my “Midnight” experience I delved deep into the world of The Airborne Toxic Event. I listened to their self-titled album front and back hundreds of times. I listened to it repeatedly. I listened to it daily. Every free minute of my days were minutes filled with TATE’s music. From their Walt Disney Hall performance to their eclectic, novel locations for their “Bombastic” videos. With tracks like “Innocence” and “Wishing Well” capturing my natural sweet tooth for literature and “Happiness is Overrated” and “Does This Mean You’re Moving On?” allowing me to reflect upon my own naive nature and teenaged angst, I was able to find peace with myself. I ate it all up. Their first album felt as if it were written from my own experiences and it connected so well with me. When I learned their songs on guitar I felt like I was learning about a part of myself that I did not realize was there. The whole experience of discovering TATE was educational. It was sensational.

I couldn’t stop. I did the same to their second album as I did to their fist. I dissected All At Once relentlessly as I found it to be a much more complex, sophisticated and powerful album in comparison to their younger, more upbeat debut album. At that time, I felt like I was living the song “Changing.” I was questioning the very world around me, from politics and love to the morbid topics of death and loss. The album felt especially politically charged with “The Kids Are Ready to Die” and “Welcome to Your Wedding Day.” And as I learned those two songs on my guitar, I felt the howling, disconnected feeling of “The Kids” and the angry, poetic punch of “Wedding Day” in my hands. Never have I spent so much time learning music that is so passionate and intimate, and although the songs were simple enough to learn – they were intelligent, they were intricate, they were sewn so delicately, but they felt as if they were built to be durable enough to withstand the test of time. That’s how I felt about all of TATE’s music at that point.

When I heard about their Spring 2013 concert schedule, I bought two tickets for their Sunday show at the House of Blues in San Diego. One for me and one for my friend who posted the video of “Midnight” on Facebook, as I wanted to share this experience with the one who shared such beautiful, life-changing music with me. This was also my very first concert, too. The trip from my humble crossroads town to San Diego was filled with music and stories that we exchanged with one another. It was pleasant and somewhat awkward at times, but all of it didn’t matter once I saw Airborne on stage.

I was standing in front of the right sound system, so close that I could feel the air being expelled from the amplifier with every breath, strum, beat and note that Airborne played. The heat and the pressure in the air around me just added to the experience of physically feeling the music. It was deafening, it was awesome, it was so much fun. There was even a fight. I mean, seriously? Who the hell gets in a fight at an Airborne concert? It went down the whole time “Sometime Around Midnight” was playing, too. The crowd rushing and shoving their way around me to avoid the fists and profanity being thrown around robbed me of my opportunity to enjoy the live performance of the song that changed my life. But I can’t say I hated the concert because of that; I loved it even more. Noah (or was it Steven?) even tossed a pick in my direction, which bounced off my chest and was unfortunately lost to the black hole within the GA floor.

It wasn’t until about midway through the concert when Mikel and Anna opened up “The Graveyard Near the House” that I realized it was my favorite song. Mikel makes minor changes to the words almost every time he plays it live and I like how it can change the dynamic and context of the song (ex. “Two actors playing our parts” and “Two actors playing two parts.” It seems insignificant, but to me it is the difference between the unity in shared falseness and the separation of falseness; it would take an essay for me to explain!). “Graveyard” is just perfect. In my mind, it’s a story of what could have been, what could be, what I could strive for when finding someone to love; it is a story that comes around full circle just as life itself does; it is somber, it is elegant, it’s a very satisfying and fulfilling song. I find the line, “I’ll carve your name out of the sky” to be so simple and empowering that I have yet to find another line that can boast its equivalence.

I was deaf in my right ear for days after that concert and I couldn’t stop talking about or listening to Airborne for months. That concert only made me hungry for more Airborne. I started reading articles and reviews about the band. I was clashing with almost all of their scrutiny and finding myself studying interviews and articles that included members from the band. I felt like the world needed to hear Airborne and appreciate and praise them for the beautiful music that they produce and the marvelous talent that they share with us, but at the same time I was glad that not everyone was listening to them. Another forum poster described it as selfish to feel like keeping Airborne all to ourselves. And reading that helped me feel like their music is more than just a novelty, their music has become a piece of my life that causes me to feel selfish about them, too: that undeserving ears will never understand or listen to TATE as I do.

The release of Such Hot Blood added more fuel to the fire. I will admit that I felt that their third album was a bit disappointing due to a lack of something I can’t yet put my finger on, but once I realized that it was an album showing a band that was maturing, I too, felt as though I was maturing as I was grasping the concepts of “What’s In A Name?” and “Timeless” and “The Storm.” It was even comical when everyone lost their cool over the realization that “Elizabeth” is a direct reference to the woman in “Midnight” and they were even more drawn in by the mystery and awe that the connection between the two songs brought to the fans. It took a few months for it to sink in, but I eventually enjoyed every song from it, especially “This Is London” and “The Fifth Day.” Their change of pace and musical direction was evoking and intriguing as I was trying to decipher the meaning and intentions of it all, which made the album that much better for me. I listened to it and I learned.

That whole consisted of nothing but Airborne on my playlists and in my ears. When I heard Airborne was going to be playing in my middle-of-nowhere-town of Corona at a tiny showing for a holiday tour to promote a local radio station, I nearly crashed my car in uncontrollable excitement. The only other time I almost crashed my car due to something music related was when Van Halen was constantly playing on the radio for weeks without end and I was sick of it all. Anyway, I rushed to get my tickets as soon as I could and I took my brother and my closest friend to the TATE concert.

It was amazing. I was about three or four yards away from Anna and Steven, in comparison to dozens of feet away in San Diego earlier that year. Mikel was hilarious and admitted that the show was their smallest show in years. He even sat down and met and talked with the fans afterwards. The show was short, only six or seven songs, but in that short time I was able to share a very unique concert experience with two of the closest people to me, catch two of Mikel’s picks and get spat on by a bitter fan who dropped one of those picks from the railing above me into my hands. After that concert, my brother couldn’t stop listening to all of Airborne’s albums. I was so happy to have people to share TATE with.

And as I type this now, it’s been over six months since that concert in my hometown. Six months without live music from your favorite band is six months too many. However, I did buy tickets to see their three opening tour shows in San Francisco this upcoming fall. I am beyond excited. Airborne is just one of those bands who really knows how to throw together a damn fine show. You can feel their energy on stage, their passion and drive as musicians, as ordinary people who love their fans, you can feel it resonate all around the room, causing this cathartic feeling for people to experience their music live.

I listen to Airborne less often as I journey onward into the world of music, but I still listen to them enough that their music is an extension of my life that I will always be able to reach into and take what I can from it. Which brings me to wonder if I had stayed with my high school sweetheart, if we had worked things out and had been “the exception” we wanted to be, would I have ever had the opportunity to discover The Airborne Toxic Event the way that I did? I sincerely doubt there is anything more fulfilling she could have offered to me over the life-changing music and experiences that helped me discover and define who I am today. Their music was there as I transitioned from being a naive, heartbroken teen to a mature adult – and I can’t even say that I’m completely there yet. But what I can say is that I am grateful and thankful for the gorgeous, compelling music and experiences that Airborne has offered  me.

Keep on being lost in the haze of the wine.

NickNick is currently a student at his local community college intent on becoming a journalist and a creative writing teacher. A recreational guitarist for seven years, when he’s not buried in schoolwork and music, he enjoys learning and writing songs. He’s also a huge fan of lyrical poetry, games involving dice and Star Wars.

By Glen

When The Airborne Toxic Event takes the stage at the Commodore Ballroom in my home town of Vancouver on Oct. 24, it will be my fifth TATE gig in 84 days, and a return to the venue where I first saw them. But this one will be extra special – because of who’s coming with me.

Whether they genuinely want to see the band or they’re just trying to get me off their back after years of hounding them every time Airborne passes through town, I’ll be accompanied on this night by a cadre of TATE virgins – five, to be exact.

Not only have they never been to a TATE show, all five of them are largely unfamiliar with the band. As a matter of fact, most of them would be hard pressed to name a single Airborne song.

I feel like I’ve got a lot riding on this night. After years of evangelizing, of explaining what exactly I have tattooed on my shoulder and why I have so many shirts with birds on them and why I feel the need to follow a band up and down the west coast once a year and why I have five copies of the same album and why I spend all my free time writing about these semi-obscure musicians from LA and why they have such a weird name, it will be hard not to take it personally if they don’t come away uber-impressed.

But I have faith in my band, and their ability to win over my friends. Nevertheless, I want to do everything I can to water the soil, to prepare them for The Best Night of Their Lives. So, naturally, I made a mixtape. Or rather, the 21st Century equivalent: a Grooveshark playlist (because we don’t have Spotify here in the underprivileged True North Strong and Free).

And then came the real trick: deciding which songs, and which versions, to include on the playlist. My quest to convert my unwitting targets began here.

I could make a case for about 40 songs. But no, better to not overwhelm them. Less is more, I told myself. Just the best of the best.

And yet, I couldn’t help myself. I couldn’t possibly leave this song off, could I?

In the end, I decided that live shows are always more fun when you recognize the music. So I gave them a 20-odd song playlist that includes all the live staples plus a few bonus tracks that I couldn’t bear not to include.

Overkill? Perhaps. But when there are this many great tunes, it’s so hard to know where to draw the line.

It did get me to thinking, though: what if I could only give them five songs? Which handful of tracks would I stake the reputation of myself my band on?

If it was aimed at a specific person, I could handpick it for my audience, according to their musical proclivities. “Papillon” and “Wedding Day” for the punk rocker. “A Letter to Georgia,” “Duet” and “All For a Woman” for the romantic balladeer. “Timeless,” “Hell and Back” and “Changing” for the one who likes her music radio friendly.

But for a diverse group such as this, I’d have no choice but to cast the net wide. I’m looking, quite simply, for the five songs that no one in their right mind could possibly resist. With apologies to “Safe,” “All I Ever Wanted” and “The Fifth Day,” which are all near the top of my personal list, here’s what I came up with.

5. Bride and Groom

Not your typical Airborne song, if there even is such a thing. But Mikel Jollett’s own favorite child features the finest poetry on Such Hot Blood, and who am I to argue with the fans who voted it far and away the most popular song on the album?

4. The Graveyard Near the House (Bombastic Version)

This delicate number has become an unexpected fan favorite, thanks to the consensus best lyrics in the TATE catalog. The Bombastic is essentially a duet between Mikel and Anna Bulbrook, with soft rain providing an unparalleled backdrop.

3. All At Once

The first time I laid eyes on the Bombastic video of “All At Once” may be the precise moment I transitioned from fan to superfan – and the studio version is even stronger. More than any other song, I am incapable of tiring of this one, no matter how many times I hit REPEAT.

2. Innocence (All I Ever Wanted Version)

If I was to choose one song that defines The Airborne Toxic Event, it would be this one. The perfect storm of arresting lyrics, live energy, punk rock, raw emotion and orchestral flourish. There’s simply nothing like it.

1. Sometime Around Midnight

Sometimes we longtime fans can begin to take for granted the power of the standard, having heard it more times than we can count. But there’s a reason it became a standard. The 2008 iTunes Alternative Song of the Year remains as potent as ever. It’s the song that made most of us fans in the first place, and it continues to do the same for virtually everyone who hears it.

So there it is. An impossible task with no satisfying answer. What would be your picks?

Glen, Fan of The Airborne Toxic Event Glen is the founder and editor of This Is Nowhere. He’s grateful for an understanding wife and kids who indulge his silly compulsion to chase a band all over the Pacific Northwest (and occasionally beyond) every time the opportunity arises.

By Susan

If you are reading this, there is a good chance you are more than a casual fan of The Airborne Toxic Event.  If you are more than a casual fan of The Airborne Toxic Event, there’s a good chance their music moves you for very personal reasons.  I doubt fans become avid fans simply because they enjoy the beat. For a band to get under your skin and into your blood, you most likely find something within the music that speaks to you on a personal level.

So there lies my dilemma.  I fell for Airborne the very first time I heard “Sometime Around Midnight” on a local college radio station.  I remember sitting in my car, waiting to go into work, refusing to turn off the radio until it was over.  Back home, later in the day, I was unable to find much information about the band with the odd name.  I did discover that there was an album in the works but nothing was currently available.  I programmed an alert in my computer to remind me to keep checking.  I eventually hit gold, an album release!  Upon its arrival, I played it continuously.  I was hooked, I became an avid fan.  So what grabbed me?  The songs supporting “Midnight” also centered around heartbreak and failed relationships.  That couldn’t be further from my life. My husband and I met at 18 and have been happily married for many, many years.  My parents, my in-laws, siblings, friends are all happily married.  I’m the rare person who has not been touched by divorce.

Then it occurred to me.  I didn’t just listen to the songs on the album, I embellished them.  I discovered that I had a rather unusual reason why this band wormed its way into my soul. I realized they sang stories, not songs and there was a very personal reason why this mattered to me.  I found my connection!

Nine years ago, on a warm Sunday, I had an all-at-once moment, long before the song by that title was written.  In one single moment, I became a different person.  Before that moment, I was an avid reader. I ran an on-line book club and I devoured the New York Times best sellers list. I volunteered at the library and my house was overrun with books. My love of reading started at a young age, when I discovered that a poor girl from the Philly slums could experience the world through the written word. I didn’t just read books, I immersed myself in the story.  Even as a child, I’d seek out complex character studies, well beyond age appropriate material.  I was fascinated by differing opinions, how characters managed conflict and how they interacted with one another.  Characters leaped off the pages and became friends or adversaries.  They taught me what and what not to do in all kinds of situations. They taught me to be empathetic and to understand other points of view. Books took me around the world, to places I never dreamt I’d visit.  They expanded my very limited reality.  This love of reading remained a big part of who I became, long after I grew up and was lucky enough to have the resources to experience the world first hand.

This was me before July 5, 2005.  At around noon on that day, I became someone else, the ‘after me.’  On that sunny Sunday, a group of us went for a bike ride as we do most weekends.  I’m an avid road cyclist and I am at home in a saddle.  But on this day, for no discernible reason, I went down, hitting the ground hard. I was unconscious and seizing (and, yes, I was wearing a helmet).  Long story short, an ambulance was called and it took me to an empty parking lot where a helicopter could land and I was medivaced to a level 1 trauma unit.  I hate drama so I’ll just say that I had a hospital stay, 3 surgeries & 7 months of physical and occupational therapy, along with neuropsycological rehab. Skin and bones healed but I was left with short term memory problems which persist to this day.  The irony, although I don’t remember it, is friends flocked to the hospital bearing gifts of books, knowing I’d be laid up for a while and would have a lot of reading time.  HA!  Little did we know that reading would become a thing of my past.  I would no longer have the ability to read for pleasure since I would be unable to keep track of characters and plot lines.

Months later, as I was working hard, learning how to manage my new brain, “Sometime Around Midnight” came on my car radio.  This band with the funny name caught my attention. They entered my life, with a story, succinctly told in a few minutes and something within me stirred.  I embraced the plot.  I felt Mikel’s pain upon seeing his ex in that bar.  He told me what she was wearing and I imagined what she looked like.  Did she really taunt him from across the bar or did he just imagine it?  Was it as awkward for her and it was for him?  What did she feel?  I imagined his friends calling him the next day, worried about him.  Did he answer his phone?  Did he contemplate calling her?  Yes, I’ll bet he did!  Did he let it ring through?  Did she answer?  With my embellishment, this four minute song became a novella.

Then the album arrived.  “Innocence” was the next song to grab me.  And so the story continued.  Ah yes, that’s exactly how he felt when he woke up the next morning.  I imagined him rattling around his apartment, replaying that night in the bar.  Who was this girl who gutted this man?  Missy, that’s who!  So off I went again, imagining this wide-eyed young woman arriving in a strange city and meeting this man.  I had no idea whether these stories were meant to be connected, that didn’t matter.  I was telling my own story, filling in the blanks, creating my own novel.  And the beauty is, if my memory fails me, I just had to press play and the story is once again alive!

This realization didn’t hit me immediately.  It came to me slowly.  But it has continued through four albums.  It has renewed my ability to imagine a life different than mine, to broaden my understanding of people in situations very different than my own.  All the things I used to get from books, I am now able to get through music.  I appreciate that Mikel’s lyrics are deliberate and that they aren’t veiled in symbolism and ambiguity.  He sets the stage for me and allows me to embellish the plotline and connect the dots.  My story arc bounces from song to song, from album to album.  In some small way, this band has served as a bridge between the before me and the after me.

This is probably not a reason why most avid fans have connected with their music, but it’s my story, and I’m thankful for the opportunity to reclaim a bit of my ‘before’ life.

SusanSusan is a wife, mom, & an avid road cyclist. She teaches Spinning classes at four gyms in the Philly suburbs and she always has an ear out for new interesting music to use in her playlists. Rarely does something grab her attention like “Sometime Around Midnight” did when she first heard it on college radio, months before its official release. The obsession has been going strong ever since. She can often be found in The Airborne Toxic Event forum, where she operates under the name Pink.

The Airborne Toxic Event played the ALTimate Christmas Party in Dec.

By Glen

We’ve entered 2014, and for the first time in, well, maybe ever, no one seems to know quite what to expect from The Airborne Toxic Event in the year ahead. Of course, the lucky ones among us are counting the days until one of 11 gigs scheduled for late January/early February, but after that, we’re looking at one big question mark. More tour dates? Another swing through Europe? Time off to write the next album? Side projects? No one can say for certain, but there’s two things you can bank on: tons of Io Instagrams from Anna Bulbrook, and This Is Nowhere keeping you in the know about any news as it breaks.

In the meantime, we’ve got a few loose ends to tie up from 2013…

The Holiday Shows: One Last Look

If you weren’t fortunate enough to catch one of TATE’s trio of holiday shows in southern California, a number of photo galleries provide a taste of what you missed. NBC San Diego and Alan Hess were both on hand for the 91x Holiday Bonus Show in San Diego, with the latter in particular catching some remarkable perspectives, not just of TATE but also the other artists with whom they shared the bill. But the most extensive collection comes courtesy of the 91X flickr account, which features not only some incredible concert photography, but also a number of unique shots including Mikel with his friends from Fitz and the Tantrums, Steven setting up in a sea of empty seats, and perhaps the best Daren action picture I’ve ever seen.

Of course, if a picture’s worth a thousand words, a video is worth ten thousand. 98.7’s ALTimate Christmas Party was a tough ticket to put it mildly, but now we can enjoy half of Airborne’s set, as “Hell and Back” and “Sometime Around Midnight” are available for our online viewing pleasure.

Hell and Back Again

If that performance of “Hell and Back” doesn’t satisfy your thirst, there’s more. Remember that JBTV performance from back in the fall, which can only be viewed by paid subscription? Well, you still have to pay to see the whole show (which I recommend), but they’ve thrown us a bone and you can now view “Hell and Back” and “Timeless” in full, at no charge.

I’ll just wait here while you soak up all this goodness…

Okay, you’re back now? Then we’ll continue.

End of Year Countdowns

It’s a staple of every blog and music column: the year-end countdown, recapping the best of the previous 365 days. In fact, in case you missed it in your holiday revelry, This Is Nowhere released not just one, but two looks back on 2013: A Year in TATE, and The Best of This Is Nowhere 2013.

Meanwhile, around the interwebs…

Our good friend Julie ran down her top six live musical highlights of 2013, featuring a pair of appearances by the best band going.

The Boston Herald proved themselves to be of impeccable taste, naming the Boston Calling festival (featuring TATE) the year’s best concert, and Such Hot Blood the fourth best album of the year.

“Sometime Around Midnight” clocked in at #36 on the ALTimate 98 countdown, a fan-voted ranking of the top 98 songs of all time.

At The Buzz of Miche Bee, blogger Heather named Such Hot Blood her second favorite album of the year.

The Fresno Beehive selected TATE’s June show with the Tulare County Symphony in Daren’s hometown of Visalia as the year’s 10th best concert in the region.

The Dented Fretboard blog named “Timeless” the seventh best song of 2013.

And last but certainly not least, Philly.com awarded Nick Hassel 34th place on its list of “Real-Life Heroes Who Won the Internet in 2013.” Who is Nick Hassel, you ask? Just some dude who answered a Craigslist ad seeking a wedding date, and pretended to be the drummer from The Airborne Toxic Event at said wedding.

Anna on the Side

While we’re not exactly sure what Mikel, Steven, Noah and Daren have been up to of late, at least one member of the band has been keeping busy. Anna recently guested with The Cold and Lovely when they shot a scene for the new ABC Family series Chasing Life.

Then, early in the New Year, she joined some other friends to record some strings for a soundtrack of some kind.

More details on both projects if/when we get them.

Toxic Gold

And finally, perhaps the shortest Toxic Gold clip we’ll ever feature. Here’s TATE performing the NBC chime, bombastic-style, with Noah’s stand-up bass in the starring role.

Glen, Fan of The Airborne Toxic EventGlen is the founder and editor of This Is Nowhere. He’s grateful for an understanding wife and kids who indulge his silly compulsion to chase a band all over the Pacific Northwest (and occasionally beyond) every time the opportunity arises.

A TATE ChristmasBy Glen

‘Twas Sometime Around Midnight on Christmas, in the Graveyard Near the House,
Not a creature was stirring, not a hand inside a blouse.
The stockings were hung by the chimney with care,
In hopes a new album soon would be there.

The TATE fans were nestled all snug in their beds,
While visions of Airborne gigs danced in their heads.
I imagined myself in Daren’s black bowler hat,
I needed a TATE fix, and I needed it STAT!

All At Once in the street there arose such a clatter,
The roar of a motorbike the silence did shatter.
In a stupor I stumbled down from the second floor,
Swaying, braying, I burst through the door.

It was a bleary-eyed night, beneath the streetlight,
I needed a moment to take in the sight.
And what to my wondering eyes should appear,
But a poet, a singer, weighed down with gear.

The bird and the mermaid, they were obvious tells,
I knew in a moment it must be Mikel.
Greedy for more, I was blinded by fame,
And I whistled, and shouted, and called them by name!

“Now Daren! Now, Steven! Now, Noah and Anna!
On, Mikel! On, Pete Galli! And you too, Bill Handlin!
To the top of the stage! To the top of the wall!
Not so high please Mikel – I’m afraid you will fall!”

And then, in a twinkling, I regained my senses,
A rare opportunity – it was time to take chances.
“It is most unexpected to find you out here,
Like the Hell and Back surprise earlier this year.”

“We take care of our fans,” he said with a wink,
“You should know that by now, wouldn’t you think?
On The Fifth Day of Christmas, your True Love asked me,
To give you a gift you never thought you’d see.”

He was dressed all in black, from his head to his foot,
And into his guitar case, his hand he did put.
“What can I give you? A bird with some gore?
Whatever you want from the TATE merchandise store!”

“All I Ever Wanted,” I slowly began,
“Was another gig befitting a crazed super fan.
Won’t you please, please play Innocence, it’s so freaking good,
Or if that can’t be done, how ’bout more Such Hot Blood?”

He was cooler than cool; I was feeling unworthy,
My insides were Numb and I was getting too wordy.
But he put me at ease with a nod of his head,
He’s good with his fans; I had nothing to dread.

So I took a deep breath, “A request if I may,
A happy TATE song for the holidays?
A little less death, a little more joy,
Something appropriate for my little boy?”

He said, “Not my style; that music sounds dated,
And holiday cheer is so overrated.
I’ve tried to be sappy; I’ve tried to write kitsch,
But sometimes Christmas can make you feel like shit.”

He sprang to his bike, flashed his 7th Heaven smile,
And then he assured me, “We’ll be back in awhile.”
And I heard him exclaim, ‘ere he drove out of sight,
“Merry Christmas to all! Make some babies tonight!”

By Glen

On September 18, 2013, The Airborne Toxic Event returned to Chicago for a triumphant show before their adoring masses at The Vic. Prior to the main event, however, the band had other business to attend to: the taping of an appearance on JBTV, which has previously hosted many of the the biggest names in modern rock history early in their careers for intimate performances and revealing interviews.

JBTV recently made the 5-song set and 20-minute interview available through Archlive, a subscription-based online TV service. A monthly subscription to the JBTV channel costs $3.99/month, which gets you access not just to the TATE performance, but all the videos in the JBTV library. Though you may or may not want to keep your subscription going indefinitely, it is certainly well worth paying for one month to indulge in another excellent performance by Airborne.

Daren Taylor kicks off the proceedings with a familiar drumbeat before Anna Bulbrook plinks the unmistakable keyboard intro to “Changing.” As Steven Chen rings out the opening guitar riff, the small, reserved crowd bobs along respectfully – a pose they would maintain throughout the show. As the front row sings along in unison with vocalist Mikel Jollett, it’s clear that the room is filled with fans. Soon, they’re joining the entire band – save Daren – in an enthusiastic clap-along.

As Mikel switches guitars and takes a moment to tune up for the second song, Daren takes it upon himself to entertain the crowd by putting his full range on display – first tapping out a quiet, jazzy number on the symbols, then pounding out a couple of brief but energetic sequences. Finally, the singer is ready to introduce the band’s newest song, “Hell and Back.” This JBTV broadcast represents the first pro-shot, non-acoustic live performance of the track, and it doesn’t disappoint, with most of the band stepping outside their usual comfort zones: Steven hammering away on an additional drum at the front of the stage, bassist Noah Harmon taking a spin on keys, and Daren trying a hip hop beat on for size.

After Mikel gets a few expletives out of his system (wrongly noting that he doesn’t think they’re recording his between-songs banter), Anna steps into the spotlight, and leads out with the melancholy viola notes that signal the band’s biggest hit to date, “Sometime Around Midnight.” As usual, it’s note perfect, with all five band members completely enveloped in their performance. It’s unusual to see a crowd remaining so stationary as the music swells to its crescendo, but perhaps that’s just the nature of a made-for-TV special like this.

“Timeless,” the lead single off the band’s most recent album, follows, the lone ballad on this day. The song is enthusiastically received, and I’m reminded how much I prefer the slightly-less-than-perfect live rendition to the more polished album version. The way that Mikel, Steven and Noah attack their instruments during the guitar breakdown late in the song breathes a ferocity into the tune that belies its sentimental lyrics, while also reflecting the real agony of loss.

The too-short set comes to a close with fan favorite, “All I Ever Wanted,” a piece that shows off each band member at their very best. It works perfectly as a finale, with the music building to a dramatic conclusion that only leaves the audience wanting more.

After a slightly awkward start to the interview portion of the broadcast, in which the band members are presented with JBTV stickers, both TATE and interviewer Lauren O’Neil hit their stride. As is typical of an Airborne Q&A, it can be difficult to discern at times whether they’re being serious or funny – when in doubt, I assume they’re jesting, particularly when they’re running down the names of their instruments (Mikel’s Gretsch: Sweetheart; Anna’s viola: Louanne; Daren’s drumkit: Bertha; Noah’s bass: Samuel L. Jackson; Steven’s guitar: Steve). There’s also a reference to a picture of a naked yoga guy who looks just like Steven, reportedly stuck to the underside of Steven’s amp.

After Daren denies that his ever-present bowler hat is an homage to Breaking Bad‘s Heisenberg, the band provides some insight into the Silver Lake music scene from whence they sprung, as well as the thought processes behind the popular Bombastic video series. “The idea was to redo the songs in a totally different context… it’s cool to hear how the songs change and they kind of take on their own life,” Steven explains. “The best part is to challenge ourselves and see what’s going to mess us up the most.” As much as playing in a moving vehicle posed some difficulties, the toughest shoot was for “It Doesn’t Mean a Thing” – an unsuccessful attempt at wrangling about 50 kittens into a video shoot, involving a “kitten whisperer” who was clearly in over her head.

While it’s disappointing that this showcase is only available via subscription, no fan of The Airborne Toxic Event will want to miss this. It is a shame that it can’t be enjoyed indefinitely without paying an ongoing fee, but I’d encourage you to check it out once, at least. Click here to view the video.

Glen, Fan of The Airborne Toxic Event Glen is the founder and editor of This Is Nowhere. He’s grateful for an understanding wife and kids who indulge his silly compulsion to chase a band all over the Pacific Northwest (and occasionally beyond) every time the opportunity arises.